Research Opportunities

PHD Dissertation Award

Applications are now being accepted for the 2017-18 George J. Stigler Center PhD Dissertation Award.

Applications are now being accepted for the 2017-18 Stigler Center PhD Dissertation Award

The Stigler Center will award up to three $15,000 dissertation awards for PhD students who are currently in their third, fourth or fifth year and are in the process of writing a dissertation about the political, economic, and cultural obstacles to better working markets. Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Effects of regulation on competition
  • Impacts of campaign financing on legislation
  • Corruption (institutional, political, and old-fashioned bribes)
  • Crony capitalism
  • Media capture
  • Judicial capture
  • Market design
  • Antitrust

The award is open to PhD students in any area not only Economics and Business, but also Political Science, Sociology, Law, Psychology, etc.), as long as their dissertations shed light on a relevant topic. The award is open to PhDs from all institutions, albeit preference will be given to PhD students at the University of Chicago.

The winners will receive $7,500 upon notification of the Prize and the rest when they submit a completed version of the paper to be posted in the Stigler Working Paper series. Besides the prize money, the students will gain access to weekly Stigler lunches, where they will be able to present their work in progress.

To Apply

Interested applicants should submit their application materials by June 30, 2017. Applications must include a 3-page dissertation proposal, a CV, and a reference letter.

Dissertation proposals and CVs must be submitted through our online application here.

Reference letters must be emailed to: Sarah.Niemann@chicagobooth.edu.

Winners will be notified by July 31, 2017.


Past Winners

2016-17

Three PhD students were selected for the Stigler PhD Award, and four for the Bradley Fellowship. The students were selected for their academic excellence and rigorous research on topics relating to the political, economic, and cultural obstacles to better working markets. The seven recipients, a diverse group from six nations, represent four departments at UChicago, and include three female students.

Stigler PhD Award Winners

i. Simcha Barkai, Joint Program in Financial Economics, University of Chicago Economics and Chicago Booth
ii. Krisztina Orban, Economics, University of Chicago
iii. Natasha Piano, Political Science, University of Chicago

Bradley Fellows

i. Silvia Beltrametti, Law, University of Chicago Law School
ii. Matthias Breuer, Accounting, Chicago Booth
iii. Simone Lenzu, Economics, University of Chicago
iv. Andrey Simonov, Quantitative Marketing, University of Chicago

Visiting Scholars Program

The Stigler Center offers visiting scholar positions for faculty members on sabbatical at different institutions to interact with University of Chicago scholars. The positions are open to scholars interested in studying the political, economic, and cultural obstacles to more competitive markets.

Topics include (but are not limited to):

i. Effects of regulation on competition
ii. Impacts of campaign financing on legislation
iii. Corruption (institutional, political, and old-fashioned bribes) 
iv. Crony capitalism
v. Media capture
vi. Judicial capture
vii. Market design 
viii. Antitrust 

The visiting scholars will receive $5000 in relocation costs and $15,000 for each working paper they produce on these topics (up to a maximum of three papers) and $10,000 per business case they write (up to a maximum of three cases). They will receive the $5000 for relocation cost and a $5,000 advance on the first project at notification of acceptance. They will receive the rest when they submit a version of the paper to be posted in the Stigler Working Paper series. Besides the money, the scholars will gain access to weekly Stigler lunches, where they will be able to present their work in progress.

To Apply

Interested applicants should submit their application materials by May 1, 2017. Applications must include a 3-page proposal for at least one paper (or one case) they want to write during their stay and a CV.

Applications must submitted through our online application here.

Funding Research (University of Chicago only)

The Stigler Center supports research on the political, economic, and cultural obstacles to more competitive markets. We provide funding support for research assistance, data purchases, and case writing to University of Chicago faculty.

Application for 2016-17 academic year is now closed.

Research Proposals:

The Stigler Center supports research on the political, economic, and cultural obstacles to more competitive markets. Topics include (but are not limited to):

i. Effects of regulation on competition
ii. Impacts of campaign financing on legislation
iii. Corruption (institutional, political, and old-fashioned bribes)
iv. Crony capitalism
v. Media capture
vi. Judicial capture
vii. Market design
viii. Antitrust

We support research assistance, data purchases, and case writing. Data purchases are subject to our Policy on Databases (see attached policy).

For research assistance, we typically provide financial support that researchers can use to compensate their own RAs. If your proposal includes a request for RA funding, please specify the number of hours, not just a dollar amount.

If you are working with coauthors from other institutions, please tell us about any applications they have made to obtain partial funding for the project.

Besides a CV, please supply:
1) A title and clear 150-word description of the project that we can share with our corporate partners and other donors.
2) A 1 to 3 page description of the project that the Stigler Center can use to evaluate the proposal.
3) A detailed explanation of your budget items. For research assistance, please include the requirements in terms of RA hours needed, not just a dollar amount.

Stigler Center Policy on Databases

Raw data purchased with Stigler Center funds, or datasets created primarily by RAs supported with Stigler Center funds, should be shared with other Stigler Center faculty whenever possible. In the case of proprietary data, researchers should make a reasonable effort to obtain permission to share the data within the Stigler Center. In the case of new datasets, researchers should make the data available after a reasonable exclusivity period.

The Stigler Center board respects the difference between data that is simply purchased (or hand entered by RAs) and databases that are created through a substantial application of skill and effort by faculty members. The goal is to encourage sharing of data where it makes sense, without discouraging faculty from investing their own time in creating new datasets.

Researchers applying for data funding should investigate the feasibility of sharing the data they plan to purchase or create, and make clear in their proposals when and to what extent this will be possible. The Stigler Center board considers the availability of data to other Booth faculty as one factor in making funding decisions.


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