Postdoctoral Research Professionals - Center for Decision Research | Chicago Booth

Postdoctoral Research Professionals

The Center for Decision Research sponsors postdoctoral research professionals to contribute to the research environment at Chicago Booth.

Stav AtirStav Atir

Email | Website

Education

PhD, Psychology, Cornell University
BS, Psychology, Yale University

Background

Stav Atir is a post-doctoral researcher at the CDR. She earned her BS in Psychology from Yale University and her PhD in Psychology from Cornell University. Her research is in the areas of judgment and decision-making and social cognition, and focuses on the way people think of themselves and others. In particular, she is interested in how people can tell what they know and what they don't know (knowledge and meta-knowledge), as well as in issues surrounding gender in professional contexts.

Stav grew up in sunny Tel Aviv. She likes good coffee and cryptic crosswords.

Selected Publications & Presentations

Atir S. & Ferguson, M. J. (2018). How Gender Determines the Way We Speak About Professionals. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 115, 7278-7283.

Atir S., Rosenzweig, E., & Dunning D. A. (2015). When Knowledge Knows No Bounds: Self-Perceived Expertise Predicts Claiming of Impossible Knowledge. Psychological Science, 26, 1295-1303.

Atir, S., & Ferguson, M. J. (August 13, 2018). Do you use someone's first name or last? The answer speaks volumes. Wall Street Journal.

Stav_Atir

Stav Atir

James DunganJames Dungan

Email | Website

Education

PhD, Social Psychology, Boston College
BS, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Background

James is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Center for Decision Research working with Dr. Nicholas Epley. He received his PhD in Social Psychology in 2017 from Boston College where he did research with Dr. Liane Young on the cognitive and neural bases of moral judgments across contexts. His work has incorporated techniques from cognitive neuroscience, social cognition, and moral psychology.

Research Interests

James is interested in moral courage and the forces that keep people from voicing their concerns. He is currently investigating courage in the contexts of whistleblowing, confrontation, and expressing support. More broadly, James is interested in characterizing loyalty and how it is balanced against other moral values, such as fairness.

Selected Publications & Presentations

Dungan, J.A. & Epley, N. (in prep). We Need to Talk: Psychological Barriers to Constructive Confrontation.

Dungan, J.A., Young, L., & Waytz, A. (invited revision). The Power of Moral Concerns in Predicting Whistleblowing Decisions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

Dungan, J.A., Chakroff, A., & Young, L. (2017). The Relevance of Moral Norms in Distinct Relational Contexts: Purity versus harm norms regulate self-directed actions. PLoS ONE, 12(3): e0173405.

Dungan, J., Waytz, A., & Young, L. (2015). The Psychology of Whistleblowing. Current Opinions in Psychology, 6, 129-133.

For a full list, see James's Google Scholar page.

Margaret EchelbargerMargaret Echelbarger

Email | Website

Education

PhD, Psychology, University of Michigan
MS, Psychology, University of Michigan 
MA, Child Language, University of Kansas
BA, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Wellesley College

Background

Margaret is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Decision Research. Prior to the University of Chicago, she was a doctoral student at the University of Michigan in developmental psychology working primarily with Susan Gelman.

Research Interests

Margaret is interested in promoting greater wellbeing across the lifespan. As a part of this, she currently examines the strategies we use to understand the contents of others’ minds, and whether the efficacy of different strategies changes as we age. In a related line of work, she also examines why we may fail to engage in prosocial behaviors, especially in cases where these acts bring about greater wellbeing. Across studies, she takes a developmental approach with the goal of understanding the ontogeny of decision making.

Selected Publications & Presentations

Gelman, S. A., & Echelbarger, M. (in press). Children, object value, and persuasion, Journal of Consumer Psychology.

Echelbarger, M., Gelman, S. A., & Kalish, C. W. (2018). Getting what you pay for: Children’s use of market norms to regulate exchanges. Child Development.

Echelbarger, M., Gelman, S. A., & Kalish, C. W. (2018). How does “emporiophobia” develop? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 41, e168.

Smith1, Craig E., Echelbarger1, M., Gelman, S. A., Rick, S. I. (2018). Spendthrifts and tightwads in childhood: Feelings about spending predict financial behavior in children. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, 31, 446-460. (denotes equal authorship)

Echelbarger, M., & Gelman, S. A. (2017). The value of variety and scarcity across development. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 156, 43-61.

Margaret Echelbarger

Margaret Echelbarger

Lauren Eskreis-Winkler

Email

Education

PhD, Psychology, University of Pennsylvania

Background

Lauren earned her PhD in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania, following which she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Wharton school.

Research Interests

As a researcher, Lauren tries to motivate people who struggle with goal achievement. She has developed and disseminated motivational interventions in the U.S., West Africa, Australia, Macedonia, and the UK. These interventions aim to motivate individuals across the spectrum – struggling athletes, students in grade school and college, individuals in the workforce, smokers trying to quit smoking, and unemployed individuals on the job market. Lauren has studied the science of motivation in collaboration with businesses, educational organizations, Minor League Baseball teams, the Macedonian Ministry of Education, and the World Bank.

Selected Publications & Presentations

Eskreis-Winkler, L., & Milkman, K., Gromet, D., & Duckworth, A (2019). “Giving Advice Raises Achievement—For the Advisor: A Field Experiment With High School Students.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 116(30), 14808-14810.

Eskreis-Winkler, L., Fishbach, A., & Duckworth, A. L. (2018). Dear Abby: Should I Give Advice or Receive it? Psychological Science, 29(11), 1797-1806.

Eskreis-Winkler, L., Shulman, E., Young, V., Tsukayama, E., & Duckworth, A. L. (2016). Using wise interventions to motivate deliberate practice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 111(5), 728-744.

Armando MeierArmando Meier

Email | Website

Education

 PhD, Economics, University of Basel

Background

Armando graduated with a PhD in economics from the University of Basel. He was a visiting PhD student at Columbia University, the University of Chicago, and Stanford University supported by a Swiss National Science Foundation fellowship.

Research Interests 

Armando does research on Public Economics, Health Economics, and Behavioral Economics. He is interested in emotions and decision-making, evaluation of public health policies, and doctor behavior.

Selected Publications & Presentations

For publications and presentations see: www.armandomeier.com

Andrew MeyerAndrew Meyer

Email

Education

PhD, Management, Yale University
BA, Psychology, Wesleyan 

Selected Publications & Presentations

Frederick, S., Levis, A., Malliaris, S., & Meyer, A. (2018). Valuing bets and hedges: Implications for the construct of risk preference. Judgment & Decision Making, 13(6), 1.

Meyer, A., Zhou, E., & Shane, F. (2018). The non-effects of repeated exposure to the Cognitive Reflection Test. Judgment & Decision Making, 13(3), 246.

Meyer, A., Frederick, S., Burnham, T. C., Guevara Pinto, J. D., Boyer, T. W., Ball, L. J., Pennycook, G., Ackerman, R., Thompson, V. A., & Schuldt, J. P. (2015). Disfluent fonts don’t help people solve math problems. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 144(2), e16.

Frederick, S. W., Meyer, A. B., & Mochon, D. (2011). Characterizing perceptions of energy consumption. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 108(8), E23.

Xuan Zhao

Email | Website

Education

PhD, Social Psychology, Brown University

BS, Chu Kochen College, Zhejiang University

Background

Xuan is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at CDR. She received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology at Brown University, where she worked with Bertram Malle in the Social Cognitive Science Lab. She also visited the Graduate School of Business and the Department of Psychology at Stanford in 2015. She earned her B.Sc. with first-class honors from Chu Kochen College, Zhejiang University and traveled around the world on Semester At Sea in 2011.

Research Interests 

Xuan's research explores two fundamentally related questions:

  • How do we perceive and interact with other people?
  • How do we perceive and interact with robots?

Xuan's first line of research highlights the simple yet often overlooked fact that people hold different perspectives, that they often perceive and conceive of the world differently from each other. In a series of projects, Xuan highlights such gaps and explore conditions that facilitate people to a) adopt others' visual perspectives, b) discuss interpersonal disagreements, c) express genuine compliments, d) engage in cooperative behaviors, and e) overcome an important barrier to help-seeking.

Given that people also f) take robots' visual "perspectives" and g) attribute human-like mind to robots, Xuan's second line of research focuses on people’s perception of and interaction with human-like machines and algorithms. During this process, Xuan has also h) created the ABOT Database—the largest database on anthropomorphic robots, and i) explored how typos can humanize a chatbot. Through this line of work, Xuan strives to reveal what makes humans human in light of the emergence of robots and AI.

Selected Publications & Presentations

Zhao, X. & Malle, B.F. (under review). Taking Robots’ Visual Perspectives: The Triggering Power of Humanlike Appearance.

Phillips, E., Zhao, X., Ullman, D., & Malle, B. F. (2018). What is human-like?: Decomposing robot human-like appearance using the Anthropomorphic roBOT (ABOT) Database. In HRI ’18: Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press. 

Zhao, X., Malle, B.F., & Gweon, H. (2016). Is it a nine, or a six? Prosocial and selective perspective taking in four-year-olds. In A. Papafragou, D. Grodner, D. Mirman, & J.C. Trueswell (Eds.), Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 924-292). Austin,TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Zhao, X., Cusimano, C., & Malle, B. F. (2016). Do people spontaneously take a robot’s visual perspective? In HRI ’16: Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, Christchurch, New Zealand (pp. 335-342). Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press. 

Li, J., Cho, M.J., Zhao, X., Ju, W., Malle, B. F. (2016). From trolley to autonomous vehicle: Perception of responsibility and moral norms in traffic accidents with autonomous cars. SAE Technical Paper 2016-01-0164. doi:10.4271/2016-01-0164

Zhao, X., Cusimano, C., & Malle, B.F. (2015). In search of triggering conditions for spontaneous visual perspective taking. In Noelle, D. C., Dale, R., Warlaumont, A. S., Yoshimi, J., Matlock, T., Jennings, C. D., & Maglio, P. P. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 37th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 2811-2816). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

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